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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
greece would have a worse depression than the great depression in the u.s. >> brown: a player in campaign politics, but what of the current debt debate? we talk with tea party ally, matt kibbe. >> warner: and as e.p.a. chief lisa jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january
, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bon
friday its newest ipad and ipad mini will hit stores there too. >> susie: greece is one step closer to getting $57 billion in bailout loans. german lawmakers approved the deal reached earlier this week. greece agreed to measures that will drastically reduce its debt over the next seven years. european stock markets and the euro rose on the news. here on wall street, tom, a neutral day on most people here, investors here feeling anxious over the gridlock on the fiscal cliff. the last day of trading for november kind of wimped out. >> tom: yeah, not a lot of price action. lots of volume, though, to end the month, lots of trading volume, but not a lot of price movement here. let's go ahead and take a look at the market focus with the major indices this friday. the major stock indices ended essentially unchanged today even with the rhetoric out of washington. the s&p 500 spent most of the session in the red after the disappointing drop in consumer spending. the index finished with a fractional gain. trading volume spiked at the end of the month. 1.2 billion shares on the big board. just
greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for the economy to grow a bit. >> susie: what if there isn't a deal?
ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s extraordinary renditions programs. it ruled that a german car salesman khaled el-masri was a victim of torture and abuse for four months at the hands of the c.i.a. el-masri said he was kidnapped from macedonia in 2003, interrogated and tortured at an afghan prison run by the c.i.a. and then dropped on an albanian mountainside when authorities realized he posed no threat. macedonia agreed to pay nearly $80,000 in damages. the u.s. has closed internal investigations into the el-masri case. starting today there should be one less reason to reach for the television remote. a new federal law went into effect banning broadcasters from airing commercials at volumes louder than the programming they accompany. the television industry has had one year to adopt the new rules. violations can be reported on the federal communication
sebastian bach. >> oh john sebastian! you're playing your music like crazy and i'm listening to it in greece! what are you doing here? oh john! why aren't you home minding the children? i at least had some business in greece! i had a father that killed every phaedra! phaedra! phaedra! >> that scene actually keeps coming to mind as i try to follow the melodrama in washington that has us heading for a cliff. a fiscal cliff. but are we? or is this, another myth in the making? for some insight, we turn to two seasoned observers both of whose books you'll want to as santa to leave in your stocking. bruce bartlett was an economic adviser to the supply-side icon jack kemp, and to two presidents -- ronald reagan and the first george bush. he got into hot water with his conservative cohorts when he wrote a widely quoted book critical of the second president bush. his most recent work is "the benefit and the burden: tax reform-why we need it and what it will take." yves smith is the founder and editor of the popular blog naked capitalism. after 25 years in the financial services industry, she now head
and reaching as far west as spain. to the east, it encompassed egypt, turkey, greece, and palestine, where jesus was born in the jewish land of judea, then ruled by king herod. >> in judea, the king, herod, was in effect a client king. he ruled almost in place of rome. he was the... he was the voice of rome, the instrument of rome, probably "instrument of rome" is best in that, because he... he had his own independent notions certainly. >> herod the great was probably one of the greatest kings of the post-biblical period in israel, but you wouldn't want your daughter to date him. he was ambitious, brutal, extremely successful. >> and it is one of the real untold ironies of jewish history that this man, who... who's the guy you love to hate in jewish history, really, leaves the most indelible mark on the face of the land of israel. >> it appears that herod thought of jerusalem as his showpiece. he really wanted to make it a place where people would come, just as people would have gone to athens, or rome, or the great cities of the mediterranean world. >> narrator: a meticulously accurate mo
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)